Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): Symptoms and Healing With Yoga

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) – Sharp Muscle
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Updated: February 25, 2023

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, or ADHD, is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder that can significantly impact daily life.

Understanding the causes, symptoms, and the diagnostic process can help individuals and their families seek appropriate treatment and support for managing ADHD symptoms.

What is Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder? The 411

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder that affects both children and adults – and can spread well into adulthood. 1 It is characterized by persistent symptoms of inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity that are often disruptive to daily life.

The inattention symptoms may include difficulty sustaining attention, forgetfulness, difficulty organizing tasks, and being easily distracted. The hyperactivity symptoms may include fidgeting, squirming, and feeling restless, while the impulsivity symptoms may include interrupting others, blurting out answers, and difficulty waiting for one’s turn.

ADHD is believed to have a genetic and environmental component, and it impacts the brain’s ability to regulate attention and self-control. The disorder can lead to difficulties in academic, work, and social settings, as well as self-esteem and emotional regulation issues.

Diagnosis of ADHD involves a comprehensive evaluation by a healthcare professional, such as a psychiatrist or psychologist, who will assess the individual’s symptoms and their impact on daily functioning. Treatment for ADHD may include medication, behavioral therapy, and lifestyle changes. With appropriate treatment and support, individuals with ADHD can learn to manage their symptoms and lead successful and fulfilling lives.

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder that impacts approximately 10% of school-aged children and 4% of adults worldwide. It is characterized by persistent symptoms of inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity that are disruptive to daily life.

In many cases, ADHD is benign, with symptoms of impulsivity, hyperactivity, and/or poor attention span close to normal for one’s age. ADHD reaches a problematic level when these tendencies lead to significant functional impairment in school, work, and other activities.

Now we find that about 11 percent of children (plus 4 percent of adults) in the U.S. are diagnosed with ADHD, this proportion rising to 15 to 20 percent per year, with men being 3 times more likely than women to be diagnosed. 2 1

Different types of ADHD

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) can manifest in different ways and can be classified into three subtypes:

  1. Hyperactive-impulsive type
  2. Inattentive type
  3. Combined type

Hyperactive-impulsive type

The hyperactive-impulsive type of ADHD is characterized by hyperactivity and impulsivity. Individuals with this subtype may have trouble sitting still, talk excessively, and have difficulty waiting for their turn. They may also engage in impulsive behavior such as interrupting others, blurting out answers, or acting without considering the consequences. In this subtype, symptoms of inattention may be minimal or absent.

Inattentive type

The inattentive type of ADHD is characterized by symptoms of inattention, such as difficulty sustaining attention, forgetfulness, and disorganization. Individuals with this subtype may have trouble with tasks that require sustained mental effort, and may appear forgetful or absent-minded. Symptoms of hyperactivity and impulsivity are typically less pronounced in this subtype.

Combined type

The combined type of ADHD is the most common subtype and involves a combination of symptoms of inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity. Individuals with this subtype may have difficulty focusing on tasks, appear fidgety or restless, and may interrupt others during conversations or activities. This subtype can be particularly disruptive to daily life and may lead to difficulties in academic, work, and social settings.

Diagnosis of ADHD subtypes involves a comprehensive evaluation by a healthcare professional, such as a psychiatrist or psychologist. The evaluation may include a medical history, physical examination, behavioral assessments, and interviews with the individual and family members or caregivers. Accurate diagnosis is essential in determining appropriate treatment and support for individuals with ADHD.

Treatment for ADHD subtypes may involve medication, behavioral therapy, and lifestyle changes. Medications such as stimulants or non-stimulants can help improve focus and reduce hyperactivity and impulsivity. Behavioral therapy, such as cognitive-behavioral therapy or parent training, can help individuals with ADHD develop coping strategies and improve social skills. Lifestyle changes such as regular exercise, a healthy diet, and a consistent routine can also be beneficial in managing ADHD symptoms.

ADHD and Other Conditions

ADHD is often associated with co-occurring disorders including dissociative, mood swings, anxiety, and substance abuse.

It does not increase a person’s risk for other conditions or diseases, but one with ADHD – especially children – are more likely to experience multiple coexisting conditions. They can sometimes make social situations more difficult or school more challenging.

The possible coexisting conditions can be:

  • Learning disabilities
  • Conduct disorder and difficulties, including antisocial behavior, fighting, and oppositional defiance disorder
  • Anxiety disorder
  • Depression
  • Bipolar disorder
  • Tourette’s syndrome
  • Substance abuse
  • Bed wetting problem
  • Sleep disorders

Symptoms of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

The symptoms of ADHD can vary in their presentation and severity, depending on the individual and their subtype of ADHD. Some individuals may exhibit more pronounced symptoms than others, and symptoms can also change over time.

Here are some of the common symptoms associated with each subtype:

Hyperactive-Impulsive Type ADHD

  • Fidgeting or squirming in seat
  • Talking excessively
  • Interrupting others
  • Difficulty waiting for their turn
  • Impulsive behavior, such as acting without considering consequences
  • Running or climbing excessively

Inattentive Type ADHD

  • Difficulty sustaining attention
  • Easily distracted
  • Forgetting or losing things 3
  • Difficulty organizing tasks and activities
  • Avoiding tasks that require sustained mental effort
  • Frequently making careless mistakes

Combined Type ADHD

  • Difficulty sustaining attention and staying on task
  • Fidgeting or squirming in seat
  • Interrupting others
  • Difficulty waiting for their turn
  • Impulsive behavior, such as acting without considering consequences

In addition to these symptoms, individuals with ADHD may also struggle with time management, procrastination, and forgetfulness. They may have trouble completing tasks on time, struggle to follow through with commitments, and have difficulty with planning and organization.

Boys and girls can exhibit very different ADHD symptoms, and boys are more likely to be diagnosed with an attention disorder.

It is possible that the nature of ADHD symptoms in boys makes their condition more noticeable than in girls.

Boys display the outward symptoms that most people think of when they think of ADHD behavior, like:

  • “Acting out” or impulsivity
  • Hyperactivity (like running and jumping)
  • Lack of attention, and inattention

ADHD in girls is often easy to overlook because it is not “typical” Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) behavior.

Symptoms are not as seen as they are in boys, which can include:

  • Low self-esteem and anxiety
  • Being withdrawn
  • Decreased attention that can lead to difficulty with academic achievement
  • Verbal aggression, such as teasing, taunting or name calling
  • Inattention or tendency to “daydream”

Causes

As with most health conditions, internal and external variables are at play with ADHD.

We know epidemiology is a factor. We also know that environmental factors are becoming increasingly important, especially with the ubiquitous presence of televisions, computers and handheld electronic devices.

Understanding the potential causes of ADHD can help inform treatment and support strategies for individuals with the disorder. The exact causes of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) are not fully understood, but research suggests that a combination of genetic, neurological, and environmental factors may contribute to its development.

Here are some of the potential causes of ADHD:

  1. Genetics:
    • ADHD tends to run in families, suggesting that genetic factors may play a role. Studies have identified several genes that may be associated with ADHD, although more research is needed to fully understand their role. 4 5
  2. Brain Structure and Function:
    • Research has shown that individuals with ADHD may have differences in the structure and function of certain areas of the brain that are involved in attention, impulse control, and executive function. For example, the prefrontal cortex, which is responsible for planning, decision-making, and impulse control, may be less active in individuals with ADHD. 6
  3. Environmental Factors:
    • Exposure to certain environmental factors, such as lead or other toxins, may increase the risk of developing ADHD. Additionally, factors such as premature birth, low birth weight, and maternal smoking during pregnancy have also been associated with an increased risk of ADHD. 7
  4. Developmental Factors:
    • Some studies suggest that early exposure to stress or trauma may increase the risk of developing ADHD. 8 3 Additionally, some researchers believe that disruptions in early brain development, such as those caused by prenatal alcohol exposure, may contribute to the development of ADHD. 9 10
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Prescriptions for treating, or healing, or living with it

Prescriptions for treating, or healing, or living with ADHD more easily vary depending on the child or adult being treated, and on the known causes and severity of symptoms.

Treatment for ADHD typically involves a combination of medication, behavioral therapy, and lifestyle changes. Here are some common prescriptions for treating, healing, or living with it:

  1. Medication:
    • Stimulant medications, such as methylphenidate and amphetamine, are commonly used to treat Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. These medications work by increasing the levels of certain neurotransmitters in the brain, which can improve focus, attention, and impulse control. Non-stimulant medications, such as atomoxetine, may also be used in some cases.
  2. Behavioral Therapy:
    • Behavioral therapy, such as cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) or parent training, can help individuals with ADHD learn new skills and strategies to manage their symptoms. CBT can help individuals with ADHD identify and challenge negative thought patterns and develop more effective coping strategies, while parent training can help parents learn how to better support their child’s needs.
  3. Interpersonal Counseling:
    • Interpersonal counseling is a type of therapy that focuses on improving communication and relationships with others. This can be especially helpful for individuals with ADHD, who may struggle with social interactions or have difficulty with interpersonal boundaries.
  4. Family Therapy:
    • Family therapy can help families learn how to better support their loved one with ADHD. This can involve education about the condition, as well as strategies for managing symptoms and improving communication within the family.
  5. Social Skills Training:
    • Social skills training can help individuals with ADHD learn how to navigate social situations more effectively. This can involve teaching specific skills, such as active listening or problem-solving, as well as providing opportunities to practice these skills in real-world settings.
  6. Support Groups:
    • Support groups can provide a sense of community and understanding for individuals with ADHD and their families. These groups can be facilitated by mental health professionals or peers, and can provide a space to share experiences, ask questions, and receive support.
  7. Lifestyle Changes:
    • Making certain lifestyle changes can also be helpful in managing ADHD symptoms. Regular exercise, a healthy diet, and adequate sleep can all help improve focus and reduce impulsivity. Creating a structured routine, breaking tasks down into smaller steps, and using tools like calendars and to-do lists can also be helpful in managing time and staying organized.

There is increasing evidence to support physical exercise in reducing ADHD symptoms as well as modalities drawn from alternative and complementary medicine.

Managing or Healing ADHD with Yoga

Perhaps the main benefit of yoga is how it helps you stay calm. It can also help you focus and control your natural impulses.

Part of yoga’s potential efficacy in healing, or curing, or managing ADHD is that it invites and even requires focus and slow movement in activities that can be exciting.

Benefits of yoga

Yoga is a mind-body practice that has been shown to have several potential benefits for individuals with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Here are some of the ways that yoga may help manage ADHD symptoms:

  • Improved Focus and Attention: Yoga involves paying attention to the breath and the body, which can help improve focus and attention. Additionally, certain yoga poses and sequences may be particularly helpful for promoting focus and concentration.
  • Reduced Impulsivity and Hyperactivity: Yoga can help reduce impulsivity and hyperactivity by promoting relaxation and self-awareness. This can help individuals with ADHD learn to better regulate their emotions and behavior.
  • Enhanced Self-Regulation and Emotional Control: Yoga can help promote self-regulation and emotional control by teaching individuals how to tune into their body and mind. This can help individuals with ADHD better understand their emotions and learn to regulate them more effectively.
  • Improved Sleep and Relaxation: Yoga can be helpful in promoting relaxation and improving sleep, which can be particularly important for individuals with ADHD. Many individuals with ADHD struggle with sleep, and poor sleep can exacerbate symptoms of the condition.

Scientific evidence supports the use of yoga as a complementary therapy for ADHD. 11 Several studies have found that yoga can be effective in improving symptoms of ADHD, including attention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity.

A study published in the Journal of Attention Disorders found that yoga was associated with improvements in attention and hyperactivity in children with ADHD. 12

Another study published in the Journal of Child and Family Studies found that a yoga program was effective in reducing symptoms of ADHD and improving academic performance in children. 11

Bottom line:
Yoga may be a helpful tool for individuals with ADHD looking to manage their symptoms. By promoting focus, relaxation, and self-awareness, yoga can help individuals with ADHD improve their attention, reduce hyperactivity and impulsivity, enhance emotional control, and improve sleep.

Yoga poses

Yoga is an ancient practice that has been found to have numerous benefits for individuals with ADHD. Developing a regular yoga practice can be a powerful tool for managing the symptoms of ADHD and promoting overall well-being.

By using engaging strategies, adapting practices to different abilities, and incorporating top yoga poses, you can experience the benefits of yoga in a fun and meaningful way.

Yoga Poses for Children with ADHD

Engaging children with ADHD in yoga practice can be challenging. Here are some strategies for engaging and motivating young learners, adapting yoga practices for different age groups and abilities, and some top yoga poses for children with ADHD.

Strategies for engaging and motivating young learners
  • Make it fun: Use playful language, incorporate games and challenges, and include music and sound effects to make yoga practice engaging and enjoyable.
  • Keep it short: Children with ADHD may have difficulty sustaining attention for extended periods, so keep yoga sessions brief and focus on a few poses or breathing exercises.
  • Be flexible: Allow for some flexibility in the practice, as children with ADHD may need to move around and release energy during the session.
  • Use visual aids: Incorporate visual aids, such as pictures and diagrams, to help children with ADHD understand the poses and follow along.
Adapting yoga practices for different age groups and abilities
  • For young children: Use simple, easy-to-follow instructions and focus on poses that engage their imagination, such as animal poses.
  • For older children: Introduce more challenging poses and incorporate mindfulness exercises, such as body scans and breath awareness.
  • For children with physical limitations: Adapt the poses to accommodate any physical limitations or disabilities, and encourage the child to focus on their breath and mental imagery.
Top yoga poses for children
  1. Tree Pose (Vrikshasana): Tree pose is a balancing pose that can help improve focus and concentration. To do the pose, stand with your feet hip-width apart and shift your weight onto one foot. Place the sole of the other foot on the inner thigh of the standing leg, and press the foot into the thigh. Bring your hands to your heart center and hold for several breaths. Repeat on the other side.
  2. Downward Facing Dog (Adho Mukha Svanasana): Downward facing dog is an energizing pose that can help improve circulation and reduce stress. To do the pose, come onto your hands and knees, with your wrists under your shoulders and your knees under your hips. Press into your hands and lift your hips up and back, straightening your arms and legs. Press your heels towards the ground and hold for a few breaths.
  3. Warrior II (Virabhadrasana II): Warrior II is a strengthening pose that can help improve focus and stability. To do the pose, stand with your feet wide apart and turn your right foot out to the side. Bend your right knee and extend your arms out to the sides, coming into a warrior stance. Hold for several breaths, then repeat on the other side.
  4. Child’s Pose (Balasana): Child’s pose is a relaxing pose that can help reduce stress and tension. To do the pose, come onto your hands and knees and lower your hips back towards your heels. Reach your arms out in front of you and rest your forehead on the ground. Hold for a few breaths.
  5. Mountain Pose (Tadasana): Mountain pose is a grounding pose that can help improve posture and balance. To do the pose, stand with your feet hip-width apart and your arms at your sides. Press into your feet and lengthen your spine. Hold for several breaths.
  6. Cat-Cow Pose (Marjaryasana-Bitilasana): Cat-cow pose is a gentle stretching pose that can help improve spinal mobility and reduce tension in the neck and shoulders. To do the pose, come onto your hands and knees and alternate between arching your back (cow pose) and rounding your spine (cat pose).
  7. Cobra Pose (Bhujangasana): Cobra pose is a backbend that can help improve posture and reduce tension in the back and neck. To do the pose, lie on your stomach with your hands under your shoulders. Press into your hands and lift your chest up, keeping your elbows close to your sides. Hold for several breaths.
  8. Butterfly Pose (Baddha Konasana): Butterfly pose is a gentle stretching pose that can help improve hip flexibility and reduce tension in the lower back. To do the pose, sit with the soles of your feet together and your knees bent out to the sides. Hold onto your ankles and gently press your knees towards the ground. Hold for several breaths.
  9. Standing Forward Bend (Uttanasana): Standing forward bend is a calming pose that can help reduce stress and tension. To do the pose, stand with your feet hip-width apart and fold forward from the hips, letting your head and arms hang towards the ground. Hold for several breaths.
  10. Savasana: Savasana is a relaxation pose that can help reduce stress and promote restful sleep. To do the pose, lie on your back with your arms at your sides and your palms facing up. Close your eyes and allow your body to relax completely. Hold for several minutes.
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Yoga Poses for Adults with ADHD

Strategies for developing a regular yoga practice
  • Set a regular schedule: Establishing a regular schedule for practicing yoga can help make it a part of your daily routine. Choose a time of day when you are least likely to be distracted, such as early in the morning or late at night.
  • Start small: It can be overwhelming to jump into a full hour-long yoga practice if you are new to the practice or have difficulty with focus and attention. Start small by practicing for just a few minutes each day, and gradually increase the duration of your practice.
  • Find a supportive community: Joining a yoga community or finding a supportive partner can help you stay motivated and accountable for your practice.
Adapting yoga practices to individual needs and schedules
  • Focus on breath: Focusing on the breath can be a simple yet powerful way to calm the mind and increase focus. Incorporating simple breathing exercises like deep belly breathing or alternate nostril breathing can be beneficial.
  • Pick appropriate poses: Certain yoga poses may be more beneficial for individuals with ADHD than others. Poses that promote balance, stability, and grounding, such as tree pose or warrior II pose, can be particularly helpful.
  • Incorporate mindfulness practices: Mindfulness practices such as meditation and body scan can be beneficial for improving focus and attention, reducing stress and anxiety, and enhancing emotional regulation.
Top yoga poses for adults

Yoga Asana exercises also contribute to self-control, especially postures that cannot be performed well without focused attention. Balancing postures are perfect in this regard as there is great difficulty in balancing without focused awareness.

  1. Mountain Pose (Tadasana): Stand tall with your feet hip-distance apart and your arms at your sides. Engage your muscles from your feet to your core to your fingertips, and take deep breaths.
  2. Downward-Facing Dog (Adho Mukha Svanasana): Start on your hands and knees, then lift your hips up and back, straightening your arms and legs. Relax your head and neck, and take deep breaths.
  3. Warrior II (Virabhadrasana II): Stand with your feet about 4–5 feet apart, then turn your left foot out and your right foot in. Bend your left knee and extend your arms out to the sides, gazing over your left hand. Repeat on the other side.
  4. Tree Pose (Vrksasana): Stand tall, then shift your weight onto one foot and lift the other foot to rest on your inner thigh or calf. Place your hands at your heart or extend them overhead. Repeat on the other side.
  5. Triangle Pose (Trikonasana): Stand with your feet wide apart, then extend your arms out to the sides. Turn your right foot out and reach your right hand toward your right foot, gazing up at your left hand. Repeat on the other side.
  6. Child’s Pose (Balasana): Start on your hands and knees, then sit back on your heels and stretch your arms forward. Rest your forehead on the mat and breathe deeply.
  7. Bridge Pose (Setu Bandhasana): Lie on your back with your knees bent and your feet flat on the mat. Lift your hips up, keeping your shoulders and feet grounded, and clasp your hands together underneath your back.
  8. Cat-Cow Stretch (Marjaryasana-Bitilasana): Start on your hands and knees, then arch your back up like a cat and then down like a cow. Move slowly and smoothly, coordinating your movements with your breath.
  9. Corpse Pose (Savasana): Lie flat on your back with your arms at your sides and your legs extended. Relax your whole body and breathe deeply.
  10. Seated Forward Fold (Paschimottanasana): Sit with your legs extended in front of you, then fold forward, reaching for your feet or shins. Relax your head and neck, and breathe deeply.

Breathing techniques

Just as you might begin most yoga practices with Ujjayi Pranayama, for people with ADHD the power of Ujjayi Breath (Controlled Breathing, or Ocean Breath) gives them a sense of being more in control of their thoughts and behaviors, which is at the heart of treatment with ADHD.

Here we recommend guiding students in each practice session in Ujjayi Breath, Viloma Pranayama, Sama/Visma Vritti, and Nadi Shodhana Pranayama, which focus on maintaining awareness of the breath. This greater concentration on the breath can contribute to greater focus and control, among other activities such as work, homework, and social activities.

Breathing techniques for children with ADHD

Breathing techniques can be a helpful tool for children with ADHD to regulate their emotions, increase focus and attention, and reduce anxiety and stress. Here are some breathing techniques that can be adapted for children with ADHD:

  • Deep belly breathing: This technique involves taking slow, deep breaths through the nose and filling the belly with air, then exhaling slowly through the mouth. Encourage children to place one hand on their belly and feel it rise and fall with each breath. This technique can help children calm their minds and bodies.
  • Counted breathing: This technique involves counting the breaths to help focus the mind and increase attention. Encourage children to inhale for a count of four, hold the breath for a count of four, and then exhale for a count of four. Repeat for several breaths.
  • Bee breath: This technique involves making a buzzing sound while exhaling, like a bee. Encourage children to inhale deeply through the nose and then exhale while making the buzzing sound. This technique can help reduce anxiety and promote relaxation.
  • Balloon breath: This technique involves imagining a balloon filling up with air as the child inhales and then deflating as they exhale. Encourage children to take deep breaths through the nose and then exhale slowly through the mouth, visualizing the balloon inflating and deflating with each breath.
Note:
Every child is unique, and what works for one child may not work for another. It may be helpful to try different breathing techniques and observe how the child responds to them. It is also important to make the practice of breathing techniques fun and engaging for children, incorporating visualizations or games to keep them interested and motivated.

Breathing techniques for adult with ADHD

Here are some breathing techniques that can be adapted for adults with ADHD:

  • Diaphragmatic breathing: Also known as belly breathing or deep breathing, this technique involves taking slow, deep breaths through the nose, filling the lungs and belly with air, and then exhaling slowly through the mouth. Place one hand on your belly and feel it rise and fall with each breath. This technique can help calm your mind and body and increase oxygen flow to the brain.
  • Alternate nostril breathing: This technique involves closing one nostril with your thumb, inhaling through the other nostril, holding the breath briefly, then exhaling through the opposite nostril. Repeat on the other side. This technique can help balance the left and right hemispheres of the brain and increase focus and attention.
  • Box breathing: This technique involves inhaling for a count of four, holding the breath for a count of four, exhaling for a count of four, and holding the breath again for a count of four. Repeat for several breaths. This technique can help slow down your breathing and calm your mind.
  • Kapalbhati breathing: This technique involves forceful exhalations through the nose while inhaling passively. Begin by taking a deep breath, exhaling forcefully through the nose, and then allowing the inhale to happen naturally. Repeat for several breaths. This technique can help increase alertness and focus.
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Meditation Helps

When your specific muscle is weak, you can do exercises to make it stronger. The same is true for your brain.

Mindfulness meditation strengthens the ability to control the attention, teaches you how to observe yourself and focus on something. Trains you to bring the wandering mind back the very moment you are distracted. It can also make you more aware of the feelings so that you are less likely to act impulsively. 13

Meditation is thought to help with ADHD because it thickens the prefrontal cortex, a part of the brain involved in focus, planning, and impulse control. It also increases the brain’s levels of dopamine, which are in short supply in ADHD brains. 14

Research shows that mindfulness meditation can be very helpful in relieving symptoms of ADHD. A landmark UCLA study found that people with ADHD who participated in mindfulness meditation sessions once a week for 2 1/2 hours, then completed a daily home meditation practice that gradually increased from 5 to 5 over 8 weeks. Increases to 15 minutes, they are able to concentrate better on tasks. They were also less depressed and anxious. 15

Yoga has also been shown to help improve symptoms of ADHD, although most of the research has been done with children. Like mindfulness meditation, it increases dopamine levels and strengthens the prefrontal cortex. 14

One study found that children who practiced 20 minutes of yoga twice a week for 8 weeks had improvements in focus and tests measuring attention. The findings suggest that this activity may be an effective complementary therapy in addition to therapies; like medication and psychological therapy. 16 17 15

In addition to helping with symptoms, this type of relaxation technique can also help people with ADHD 18:

Combining Yoga with Other ADHD Treatments

Using yoga as a complementary therapy for ADHD medication

ADHD medications can be effective in managing ADHD symptoms, but they may also come with side effects or not work for everyone. Yoga can be a complementary therapy to medication that can help manage symptoms, reduce side effects, and promote overall well-being.

Yoga can help regulate breathing, increase body awareness, and reduce stress, which can help alleviate some of the physical and emotional side effects of ADHD medication. Practicing yoga regularly can also help improve focus, attention, and self-regulation, which are key areas of difficulty for individuals with ADHD.

It is important to consult with a healthcare professional before using yoga as a complementary therapy for ADHD medication. They can help develop an individualized treatment plan that incorporates both medication and yoga, and can monitor progress and make adjustments as needed.

Incorporating yoga into a holistic treatment plan for ADHD

ADHD is a complex condition that affects individuals in various ways. A holistic treatment approach that addresses the physical, emotional, and social aspects of ADHD can be more effective than a single treatment method. Yoga can be a valuable component of a holistic treatment plan for ADHD.

In addition to the physical benefits of yoga, such as increased flexibility and strength, yoga can also help manage stress and anxiety, improve sleep, and promote mindfulness and self-awareness. These benefits can help individuals with ADHD better manage their symptoms and improve their overall quality of life.

Incorporating yoga into a holistic treatment plan for ADHD can also include other complementary therapies such as mindfulness meditation, cognitive-behavioral therapy, and nutritional counseling. It is important to work with a healthcare professional to develop an individualized treatment plan that addresses the unique needs of each individual with ADHD.

Collaborating with healthcare professionals for optimal results

Yoga can be a valuable tool for managing ADHD symptoms, but it is essential to work with a healthcare professional to develop an individualized treatment plan that addresses the unique needs of each individual with ADHD.

Healthcare professionals can provide guidance on adapting yoga practices to meet individual needs, monitor progress, and make adjustments as needed. They can also provide information on other complementary therapies, such as medication, cognitive-behavioral therapy, or social skills training, that can be used in conjunction with yoga for optimal results.

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