Compound Exercises 101: Target multiple muscle groups at once and achieve your fitness goals

Compound Exercises 101

The ultimate guide to compound exercises, getting the most out of your workouts building muscle, strength, and overall fitness while targeting multiple muscle groups at once.

What is Compound Exercises?

Compound Exercises 101

A compound exercise is a type of strength training exercise that involves multiple muscle groups and joints working together. These exercises are considered more efficient for building muscle and strength, as well as for improving functional fitness, compared to isolation exercises, which focus on one muscle group at a time. Examples of compound exercises include the squat, deadlift, bench press, rows, and pull-ups.

Compound exercises are also known as multi-joint exercises, functional exercises, or compound movements. They are called compound exercises because they involve multiple joints and muscle groups working together during the movement.

Other terms often used to describe compound exercises include:

  • Multi-planar exercises: Compound movements often involve movement in multiple planes of motion, such as sagittal, frontal, and transverse plane.
  • Complex exercises: These exercises are often considered to be more complex than isolation exercises, as they require coordination and balance between multiple muscle groups.
  • Total body exercises: Compound exercises often target multiple muscle groups at once, which can be considered a full-body workout.
  • Free weight exercises: Many compound exercises are performed using free weights such as barbells, dumbbells, and kettlebells, as opposed to machines.
  • Hybrid exercises: Some compound exercises can be considered hybrids of other exercises, such as thrusters, which are a combination of a squat and a press.
  • Ground-based exercises: Many compound exercises are performed on the ground and require stability from the core and lower body, such as deadlifts, squats, and lunges.

Benefits of compound exercises

Here are the benefits of incorporating compound exercises into a workout routine include:

  • Increased muscle mass: Compound exercises target multiple muscle groups at once, which helps to increase muscle mass and overall strength. 1
  • Improved cardiovascular fitness: Functional exercises require a significant amount of energy and effort, which can improve cardiovascular fitness. 2
  • Increased calorie burn: Compound exercises require more energy to perform than isolation exercises, which can lead to a higher calorie burn. 3
  • Greater functional strength: Multi-joint exercises mimic everyday movements, which can lead to greater functional strength and improved ability to perform daily tasks. 4 5
  • Time-efficient: Compound exercises allows you to target multiple muscle groups at once, which can save you time in the gym.
  • Better athletic performance: Compound movements can help to improve power, strength, and endurance, which can lead to better athletic performance. 6
  • Reduced risk of injury: Multi-joint exercises help to improve balance and coordination, which can reduce the risk of injury. 7
  • Increased bone density: Compound exercises, especially weight-bearing exercises, put stress on bones, which can lead to increased bone density and a reduced risk of osteoporosis. 8
  • Improved posture: Functional exercises that target the back and core muscles can help to improve posture, which can have a positive impact on overall health and appearance. 9 10
  • Increased muscle endurance: Compound exercises require the use of multiple muscle groups, which can lead to increased muscle endurance and the ability to perform more reps. 11
  • Increased muscle activation: Compound movements activate more muscle fibers than isolation exercises, which can lead to greater muscle activation and improved muscle growth. 12
  • Greater overall fitness: Multi-joint exercises have a greater overall fitness benefit than isolation exercises, as they work multiple muscle groups and improve cardiovascular fitness, strength and power, and flexibility.
  • Increased fat burning: Compound exercises can increase the number of calories burned during a workout, which can lead to increased fat burning and weight loss. 13 14
  • Greater overall flexibility: Compound movements can improve flexibility in multiple muscle groups, which can reduce the risk of injury and improve overall movement patterns.
  • Greater mental focus: The complexity of compound exercises can require greater focus and concentration, which can lead to improved mental focus and cognitive function.

When to incorporate compound exercises?

Compound exercises should be incorporated into your workout routine as a foundation for building overall strength and muscle mass.

They are typically performed early in a workout, when energy levels are high, and they can be done with heavier weights and lower reps. They are also great for working multiple muscle groups at once, making them time-efficient.

Here is an example of a workout structure that incorporates compound exercises:

  • Warm-up: 5–10 minutes of light cardio to increase blood flow and prepare the body for the workout.
  • Compound exercises: Start with the compound exercises that target the major muscle groups, such as the chest, back, legs, and shoulders. Aim for 3–4 sets of 6–8 reps.
  • Isolation exercises: After finishing the compound exercises, move on to isolation exercises that target specific muscle groups, such as the biceps, triceps, and abs. Aim for 3–4 sets of 8–12 reps.
  • Cool-down: Finish with 5–10 minutes of stretching to increase flexibility and prevent soreness.

It’s important to note that this is just an example and it’s essential to find a workout schedule that works best for you.

Incorporating both compound and isolation exercises

Compound exercises are not always better than isolation exercises and vice versa, you need to find a balance between the two, that will work for you.

When it comes to incorporating compound and isolation exercises in your workout routine, it depends on your goals, experience level and the specific muscle groups you want to target.

If your goal is to build overall strength and muscle mass, it is recommended to start with compound exercises that work multiple muscle groups at once, such as the deadlift, squats, bench press, and rows. These exercises are typically performed early in a workout, when energy levels are high, and they can be done with heavier weights and lower reps.

After finishing the compound exercises, you can move on to isolation exercises that target specific muscle groups, such as biceps, triceps, and abs. Isolation exercises are typically performed later in a workout, when energy levels are lower, and they can be done with lighter weights and higher reps.

If your goal is to improve muscle definition and symmetry, you may want to incorporate more isolation exercises, as they allow you to focus on specific muscle groups and can help to increase muscle activation in those areas.

How many repetitions

The number of reps that you should do for compound exercises will depend on your fitness goals and current level of strength.

  • For muscle building and strength: If your goal is to build muscle and increase strength, it is generally recommended to perform compound exercises in the range of 3–5 reps per set, with a heavy weight and relatively low number of sets (3-5). This rep range is known as low reps, heavy weight or powerlifting rep range.
  • For muscle endurance: If your goal is to improve muscle endurance, it is generally recommended to perform compound exercises in the range of 8-12 reps per set, with a moderate weight and a higher number of sets (3-4). This rep range is known as moderate reps, moderate weight or body building rep range.
  • For overall fitness: If your goal is overall fitness, you may perform compound exercises in a range of 8–15 reps per set, with a moderate weight and moderate number of sets(3-5). This rep range is known as moderate reps, moderate weight or general fitness rep range.

Best compound exercises

Take your workout to the next level with this comprehensive list of compound exercises for multiple muscle groups at once and achieve your fitness goals with the best exercises for chest, back, shoulders, arms, legs, and abs. Increase your strength and muscle mass with our expert-recommended compound exercise list.

It’s essential to find a workout schedule that works best for you, starting any new exercise program to ensure that your workout plan is tailored to your specific goals and fitness level.

Here are some of the best compound exercises for each muscle group, these exercises are just examples, and there are many other compound exercises that can be included in a workout routine.

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1. Best chest exercises

Here are the 12 best chest compound exercises that target multiple muscle groups:

  1. Barbell bench press: The barbell bench press exercise targets the chest, shoulders, and triceps muscles. It is performed by lying on a flat bench and pressing a barbell upwards using a wide grip. It is considered as one of the most effective exercises for chest development.
  2. Smith machine chest press: This exercise targets the chest, shoulders, and triceps muscles. It is performed by using a Smith machine and pressing the barbell upwards using a wide grip.
  3. Dumbbell bench press: This exercise targets the chest, shoulders, and triceps muscles. It is performed by lying on a flat bench and pressing dumbbells upwards using a wide grip. It allows for a greater range of motion than the barbell bench press and can help to target the chest muscle more effectively.
  4. Incline barbell bench press: The incline barbell bench press exercise targets the upper chest, shoulders, and triceps muscles. It is performed by lying on an incline bench and pressing a barbell upwards using a wide grip. It is considered as one of the best exercises for targeting the upper chest muscle.
  5. Incline Smith machine chest press: This exercise targets the upper chest, shoulders, and triceps muscles. It is performed by using a Smith machine and pressing the barbell upwards on an incline bench using a wide grip.
  6. Incline dumbbell press: This exercise targets the upper chest, shoulders, and triceps muscles. It is performed by lying on an incline bench and pressing dumbbells upwards using a wide grip. It allows for a greater range of motion than the incline barbell bench press and can help to target the upper chest muscle more effectively.
  7. Decline barbell bench press: The Decline barbell bench press exercise targets the lower chest, shoulders, and triceps muscles. It is performed by lying on a decline bench and pressing a barbell upwards using a wide grip. It is considered as one of the best exercises for targeting the lower chest muscle.
  8. Decline dumbbell bench press: This exercise targets the lower chest, shoulders, and triceps muscles. It is performed by lying on a decline bench and pressing dumbbells upwards using a wide grip. It allows for a greater range of motion than the decline barbell bench press and can help to target the lower chest muscle more effectively.
  9. Dips (chest version): The dips exercise targets the chest, shoulders, and triceps muscles. It is performed by using parallel bars or dip station and lowering the body while keeping the elbows close to the body.
  10. Landmine press: This exercise targets the chest, shoulders, and triceps muscles. It is performed by holding one end of a barbell with both hands, placing the other end on the ground and pressing upwards. It allows for a unique range of motion that targets the chest muscle more effectively.
  11. Push-ups: The push-ups exercise targets the chest, shoulders, and triceps muscles. It is performed by pushing the body up and down using the hands and feet while keeping the body in a plank position. It is a great exercise for overall upper body strength and can be modified to target specific areas of the chest muscle.
  12. Dumbbell pullover: This exercise targets the chest, shoulders, and triceps muscles. It is performed by lying on a bench and holding a dumbbell with both hands, extending it over the head and then pulling it back over the chest.

2. Best back exercises

Here are the 14 best back compound exercises that target multiple muscle groups:

  1. Barbell deadlifts: The barbell deadlift exercise targets the lower back, glutes, hamstrings, and upper back muscles. It is performed by holding a barbell in front of the body and lifting it off the ground using proper form. It is considered as one of the most effective exercises for overall back and lower body strength.
  2. Pull-ups: The pull-ups exercise targets the latissimus dorsi, biceps, and upper back muscles. It is performed by gripping a pull-up bar and pulling the body upwards using proper form.
  3. Chin-ups: The chin-ups exercise targets the latissimus dorsi, biceps, and upper back muscles. It is performed by gripping a pull-up bar with palms facing towards the body and pulling the body upwards using proper form.
  4. Lat pulldown: The lat pulldown exercise targets the latissimus dorsi and upper back muscles. It is performed by sitting down and pulling a bar towards the chest using proper form.
  5. Barbell rows: The barbell rows exercise targets the latissimus dorsi, rhomboids, and upper back muscles. It is performed by holding a barbell and pulling it towards the chest using proper form.
  6. Dumbbell rows: This exercise targets the latissimus dorsi, rhomboids, and upper back muscles. It is performed by holding a dumbbell and pulling it towards the chest using proper form.
  7. Pendlay row: This exercise targets the latissimus dorsi, rhomboids, and upper back muscles. It is similar to a barbell row, but the barbell is rested on the floor at the start of each rep.
  8. T-bar rows: This exercise targets the latissimus dorsi, rhomboids, and upper back muscles. It is performed by holding onto a T-bar and pulling it towards the chest using proper form.
  9. TRX suspension rows: This exercise targets the latissimus dorsi, rhomboids, and upper back muscles. It is performed by holding onto TRX handles and pulling the body towards the handles using proper form.
  10. Inverted rows: This exercise targets the latissimus dorsi, rhomboids, and upper back muscles. It is performed by holding onto a bar or rings and pulling the body towards the bar using proper form.
  11. Neutral grip pulldown: This exercise targets the latissimus dorsi and upper back muscles. It is performed by using a pulldown machine with a neutral grip and pulling the bar towards the chest.
  12. Landmine rows: This exercise targets the latissimus dorsi, rhomboids, and upper back muscles. It is performed by holding one end of a barbell and pulling it towards the chest using proper form.
  13. Standing lat pulldown: This exercise targets the latissimus dorsi and upper back muscles. It is performed by using a pulldown machine or cable and pulling the bar towards the chest while standing.
  14. Pullover: This exercise targets the latissimus dorsi and upper back muscles. It is performed by lying on a bench and holding a barbell or dumbbell and pulling it over the head towards the chest using proper form.

3. Best shoulder exercises

Here are the best 12 shoulder compound exercises that target multiple muscle groups:

  1. Seated barbell overhead press: The overhead press exercise targets the shoulders, triceps, and upper chest muscles. It is performed by sitting down and pressing a barbell overhead using proper form.
  2. Standing overhead press: This exercise targets the shoulders, triceps, and upper chest muscles. It is performed by standing and pressing a barbell or dumbbells overhead using proper form.
  3. Push press: The push press exercise targets the shoulders, triceps, and upper chest muscles. It is performed by standing and pressing a barbell or dumbbells overhead, using a leg drive to assist the movement.
  4. Landmine shoulder press: This exercise targets the shoulders, triceps, and upper chest muscles. It is performed by holding one end of a barbell and pressing it overhead using proper form.
  5. Barbell upright row: This exercise targets the shoulders, upper back, and traps muscles. It is performed by holding a barbell and lifting it upwards using proper form.
  6. Dumbbell Shoulder Press: This exercise targets the shoulders, triceps, and upper chest muscles. It is performed by standing and pressing dumbbells overhead using proper form.
  7. Arnold press: This exercise targets the shoulders, triceps, and upper chest muscles. It is performed by standing and pressing dumbbells overhead while rotating the wrists during the press.
  8. Dumbbell upright row: This exercise targets the shoulders, upper back, and traps muscles. It is performed by holding dumbbells and lifting them upwards using proper form.
  9. Smith machine shoulder press: This exercise targets the shoulders, triceps, and upper chest muscles. It is performed by using a Smith machine and pressing the barbell overhead using proper form.
  10. Smith machine upright row: This exercise targets the shoulders, upper back, and traps muscles. It is performed by using a Smith machine and lifting the barbell upwards using proper form.
  11. Dumbbell rear delt row: This exercise targets the rear deltoids and upper back muscles. It is performed by holding dumbbells and pulling them towards the body using proper form.
  12. Barbell rear delt row: This exercise targets the rear deltoids and upper back muscles. It is performed by holding a barbell and pulling it towards the body using proper form.
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4. Best arm exercises

Biceps and forearms:

Here are the 9 best biceps and forearms compound exercises that target multiple muscle groups:

  1. Barbell Curl: This exercise targets the biceps, brachialis, and brachioradialis. It can be done by standing with your feet shoulder-width apart, holding a barbell with an underhand grip and curling the barbell towards your shoulders while keeping your elbows close to your body.
  2. Barbell Drag Curl: This exercise targets the biceps, brachialis, and brachioradialis. It can be done by standing with your feet shoulder-width apart, holding a barbell with an underhand grip, curling the barbell towards your shoulders while keeping your elbows close to your body and pulling the barbell towards your torso.
  3. Dumbbell hammer curl: This exercise targets the forearms, biceps and brachialis. It can be done by standing with your feet shoulder-width apart and holding a pair of dumbbells at your sides with your palms facing your thighs, then curl the dumbbells towards your shoulders while keeping your elbows close to your body.
  4. Pull-ups and Chin-ups: The pull-ups and chin-ups exercise targets the biceps, forearms, latissimus dorsi and upper back muscles. It can be done by using a pull-up bar, grip it with an overhand or underhand grip, hang at arm’s length and pull your chest up to the bar.
  5. Barbell clean and press: This exercise targets the biceps, shoulders, legs and also engages the forearms. It can be done by starting with a deadlift then explosively lifting the barbell to your shoulders and press the weight overhead, in one movement.
  6. Barbell reverse wrist curl: This exercise targets the forearms, wrist extensors and also engage the biceps. It can be done by sitting on a bench with a barbell placed across your lap, and using your wrists to curl the barbell up and down.
  7. Barbell wrist curl: This exercise targets the forearms, wrist flexors and also engage the biceps. It can be done by sitting on a bench with a barbell placed across your lap, and using your wrists to curl the barbell up and down.
  8. Barbell farmer’s walk: This exercise targets the forearms, shoulders and core muscles, and also engage the biceps. It can be done by holding a barbell at your sides, with your palms facing your body, and walk forward for a certain distance.
  9. Plate pinch grip: This exercise targets the forearms, grip strength and also engage the biceps. It can be done by holding two weight plates together, one in each hand, and squeeze the plates together as hard as you can, hold for a few seconds and then release.

Triceps exercises

Here are the best 13 triceps compound exercises that target multiple muscle groups:

  1. EZ-Bar Skull Crusher: This exercise targets the triceps, using an EZ-bar and lying on a flat bench to perform the movement.
  2. Incline Skull Crusher: This exercise targets the triceps, using a barbell or dumbbells and lying on an incline bench to perform the movement.
  3. Decline Skull Crusher: This exercise targets the triceps, using a barbell or dumbbells and lying on a decline bench to perform the movement.
  4. Close Grip Bench Press: This exercise targets the triceps, using a barbell or dumbbells while using a close grip to perform the movement.
  5. Tricep Extensions: This exercise targets the triceps, using a barbell, dumbbells, or cable machine to perform the movement.
  6. Diamond Push-ups: This exercise targets the triceps, using bodyweight while using a close grip position to perform the movement.
  7. Close Grip Triceps Push-ups: This exercise targets the triceps, using bodyweight while using a close grip position to perform the movement.
  8. Elevated Pike Push-up: This exercise targets the triceps, using bodyweight while using an elevated surface to perform the movement.
  9. Dumbbell Tate Press: This exercise targets the triceps, using a pair of dumbbells to perform the movement.
  10. Reverse Grip Barbell Bench Press: This exercise targets the triceps, using a barbell with a reverse grip to perform the movement.
  11. Parallel Bar Triceps Dip: This exercise targets the triceps, using parallel bars to perform the movement.
  12. Close Grip Stability Ball Push-up: This exercise targets the triceps, using a stability ball and a close grip position to perform the movement.
  13. Bench Dip: This exercise targets the triceps, using a bench or parallel bars to perform the movement.

5. Best legs and calves exercises

Legs eexercises:

Here are the 11 best legs compound exercises that target multiple muscle groups:

  1. Squat: This exercise targets the quadriceps, hamstrings, glutes, and lower back muscles by performing a movement similar to sitting down and standing up.
  2. Sumo squat: This exercise targets the quadriceps, hamstrings, glutes and inner thighs by performing a squat with a wide stance and toes turned out.
  3. Deadlift: This exercise targets the hamstrings, glutes, lower back, and upper back muscles by lifting a weight off the ground.
  4. Sumo-Deadlift: This exercise targets the hamstrings, glutes, lower back, and upper back muscles by lifting a weight off the ground using a wider stance and toes turned out.
  5. Romanian Deadlift: This exercise targets the hamstrings, glutes, lower back, and upper back muscles by lifting a weight off the ground by hinging at the hips.
  6. Hack squat: This exercise targets the quadriceps, hamstrings, glutes by performing a squat movement while standing on a hack squat machine.
  7. Leg press: This exercise targets the quadriceps, hamstrings, glutes and calves by performing a press movement while seated on a leg press machine.
  8. Smith machine squat: This exercise targets the quadriceps, hamstrings, glutes and lower back muscles by performing a squat movement while using a Smith machine.
  9. Goblet squat: This exercise targets the quadriceps, hamstrings, glutes and lower back muscles by performing a squat movement while holding a weight in front of the chest.
  10. Barbell Glutes Bridge: This exercise targets the glutes, hamstrings and lower back muscles by performing a bridge movement while lying on the floor and using a barbell.
  11. Lunge: This exercise targets the quadriceps, hamstrings, glutes and core muscles by performing a lunge movement with one leg forward and the other leg back.

Calves exercises

Here are the 5 best calves compound exercises that target multiple muscle groups:

  1. Standing Calf Raise: This exercise targets the calf muscles (gastrocnemius and soleus) by performing a calf raise movement while standing on a calf raise machine or using a barbell or dumbbells.
  2. Seated Calf Raise: This exercise targets the calf muscles by performing a calf raise movement while sitting on a calf raise machine.
  3. Leg Press Calf Raise: This exercise targets the calf muscles by performing a calf raise movement while using a leg press machine.
  4. Donkey Calf Raise: This exercise targets the calf muscles by performing a calf raise movement while in a bent-over position on a calf raise machine or using a barbell or dumbbells.
  5. Hill Sprints: This exercise targets the calf muscles by sprinting up a hill or incline.

6. Best abs exercises

Here are the 13 best abs exercises that considered as compound exercises:

  1. Box jumps: This exercise targets the abs and core by jumping onto a box or platform.
  2. Farmer’s walk: This exercise targets the abs, core, grip and also engage the shoulders by holding a weight in each hand and walk for a certain distance.
  3. Plate twist: This exercise targets the abs, obliques and also engage the core by holding a weight plate with both hands and twisting your torso to the left and right.
  4. Medicine ball slams: This exercise targets the abs, core and shoulders by holding a medicine ball and slamming it down on the ground.
  5. Barbell roll-out: This exercise targets the abs, core and shoulders by kneeling on the floor and rolling a barbell out in front of you.
  6. Ab wheel roll-outs: This exercise targets the abs and core by using an ab wheel and rolling it out in front of you while keeping your body in a plank position.
  7. Leg raises: This exercise targets the abs and lower abs by lying on the floor and raising your legs up towards the ceiling.
  8. L-sit pull-ups and chin-ups: This exercise targets the abs, upper back, biceps, and shoulders by performing a pull-up or chin-up while keeping your legs in an L-sit position.
  9. RKC plank: This exercise targets the abs, core and shoulders by holding a plank position while engaging the abs, glutes and back muscles.
  10. Plank: This exercise targets the abs, core and shoulders by holding a plank position with your body in a straight line.
  11. Renegade row: This exercise targets the abs, core, back, and shoulders by performing a row movement while in a plank position.
  12. Bear crawl: This exercise targets the abs, core, back, and shoulders by crawling on your hands and feet while keeping your hips low.
  13. Turkish get-up: This exercise targets the abs, core, shoulders, and legs by starting in a lying position and getting up to a standing position while holding a weight overhead.
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Pros and cons of compound exercises

Pros of compound exercises:

  • Efficient muscle and strength building: Compound movement involve multiple muscle groups and joints working together, making them more efficient for building muscle and strength than isolation exercises.
  • Improved functional fitness: Compound movement mimic everyday movements and can improve functional fitness, helping you to perform daily tasks with ease.
  • Increased calorie burn: Compound movement require more energy to perform and can increase calorie burn, helping with weight loss and overall fitness.
  • Time-saving: Compound exercises can save time in the gym by working multiple muscle groups in one exercise, rather than isolating one muscle group at a time.
  • Greater hormonal response: Compound movements tend to cause a greater hormonal response, releasing growth hormone and testosterone which can lead to muscle growth and fat loss.

Cons of compound exercises:

  • Risk of injury: Compound movements are generally more demanding and can put more stress on joints and tendons, increasing the risk of injury if proper form is not maintained.
  • Need of proper technique: Compound movements often require proper technique and a certain level of strength and skill, which can make them difficult for beginners.
  • Greater demand on the nervous system: Compound exercises tend to have a greater demand on the nervous system, which can lead to fatigue and muscle soreness.
  • Less isolation: Compound movements are not good for isolating a specific muscle group, and may not be suitable for those who want to target a specific muscle group for aesthetic reasons.

Who should do and don’t

Who should do compound exercises:

  • Individuals looking to build muscle and increase strength: Compound exercises are efficient for building muscle and increasing strength, making them suitable for those looking to add muscle mass and improve their overall strength.
  • Individuals looking to improve functional fitness: Compound exercises mimic everyday movements and can help improve functional fitness, making them suitable for those who want to improve their ability to perform daily tasks with ease.
  • Individuals looking to increase calorie burn and lose weight: Compound exercises require more energy to perform and can increase calorie burn, making them suitable for those looking to lose weight and improve overall fitness.
  • Individuals looking to save time in the gym: Compound exercises can save time in the gym by working multiple muscle groups in one exercise, making them suitable for those who want to make the most of their gym time.

Who should not do compound exercises:

  • Individuals with certain medical conditions: If you have a medical condition that affects your joints or muscles, you should consult with a healthcare professional before starting any new exercise program.
  • Individuals with poor form or technique: Compound exercises require proper technique and a certain level of strength and skill, so if you are new to exercise or have poor form, it is best to start with isolation exercises and work on your technique before attempting compound exercises.
  • Individuals recovering from an injury: If you are recovering from an injury, it is important to consult with a healthcare professional before starting any new exercise program.
  • Individuals who prefer isolation exercises: Compound exercises are not good for isolating a specific muscle group and may not be suitable for those who want to target a specific muscle group for aesthetic reasons.

Bottom line

Compound exercises are considered to be more efficient than isolation exercises, and they are generally recommended to be included in most workout routines. Compound exercises include exercises such as squats, deadlifts, bench press, rows, and pull-ups. These exercises are known to be effective in building muscle, strength, and overall fitness.

A well-rounded workout routine should include a mix of compound and isolation exercises. Compound exercises should be used as the foundation of the workout routine, and isolation exercises can be added to target specific muscle groups and to add variety to the workout.

It’s important to consult with a healthcare professional or a certified personal trainer before starting any new exercise program to ensure that your workout plan is tailored to your specific goals and fitness level.

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